Church of the Holy Cross, Crediton

Visit the church with a fascinating 1100+ year history. In the early 10th century, Crediton was chosen as the cathedral for Devon and Cornwall (built c. 910 AD). Like many Saxon cathedrals it was almost certainly of wooden construction, but no evidence of it remains. In 1046 Leofric moved the cathedral to Exeter. The construction […]

Visit the church with a fascinating 1100+ year history.

In the early 10th century, Crediton was chosen as the cathedral for Devon and Cornwall (built c. 910 AD). Like many Saxon cathedrals it was almost certainly of wooden construction, but no evidence of it remains. In 1046 Leofric moved the cathedral to Exeter.

The construction of  a Norman church on the present site was started in the 1130s, and its present dedication – the Church of the Holy Cross and the Mother of Him Who Hung Thereon – came into use 100 years later. The church was extended in the late 13th century by the addition of the Lady Chapel and the Chapter House.

As parliament passed an act in 1545 to transfer ownership of collegiate churches to the King, Crediton Parish Church was “surrendered” to Henry VIII but then purchased back by parishioners shortly after for a sum of £200. In 1547 Edward VI signed a charter to create a new governance structure for Crediton Parish Church, whereby a corporation of 12 governors – the Crediton Church Corporation – were to administer the Church and its endowments. The CCC still own and administer the church buildings today. Only two other parish churches in England – Ottery St Mary (Devon) and Wimborne Minster (Dorset) – have a similar form of governance.